Posted in Anointing, prophetic

Joseph’s 4 Coats and David’s 3 Anointing’s

I remember the day I lost my coat, or rather, had it taken from me. Like Joseph, I was falsely accused and ended up running from the ministry I was in. It was all part of the Father’s plan. About a year later, my husband would also retire his position as an associate pastor, and we both would go on a journey that looked nothing like we imagined it would. During that period of introspection and searching out His Feasts and Torah, we missed ministry but learned so much. Four years later, I was praying about my coat, our ministry gifts, and asking Abba if we would ever get back to speaking and teaching at an assembly again. We longed to gather with like-minded believers. For weeks, I had been getting confirmation that Abba was going to give me another coat.

 I thought of Joseph, who had a bloody coat, a servant’s coat, a managing warden coat, and then a royal robe. How many coats and shoes do we exchange walking through this thing called life? A man of many hats. A woman of many purses. Time passes by, and we change. We change our converse for work shoes or our shoulder bags for diaper bags. But sometimes, we change the most in the prison or hiding in caves. The hardships, the crushing grief, the sickness, the addiction, the divorce, the loss of a loved one, the silence from those we thought were our confidants. Heat the kettle, and it screams. Abba places us in the furnace, and we change. The ultimate goal? Gold. Shiny–gold. (Proverbs 27:21) “The crucible is for silver and the furnace for gold. And each is tested by the praise accorded him.” (Psalm 66:10) “For You, O God, have tested us; You have refined us like silver.” (Zechariah 13:9) “This third I will bring through the fire; I will refine them like silver and test them like gold. They will call on My name, and I will answer them. I will say, ‘They are My people,’ and they will say, ‘The LORD is our God.'”

So back to the coat.

A woman gave us a prophetic word that we were going to plant a sword in KY and that it was going to make a sound and that people would hear. Shortly after our confirmations, one day after watching a children’s movie, and bawling at the message that was piercing my heart, a message about perfect love casting out fear and being able to take the gloves off and celebrate our giftings without harming others, my husband walked through the door carrying a bag. My husband has never bought me clothes. I am not talking about money; I am talking about picking out clothing as a surprise. He came waltzing in with a boutique bag and sat it down in the chair next to me. I said, “What is this about?” He said, “I went to a boutique to get my mom a gift and felt strongly that I was supposed to buy you this. I don’t know if you’ll like it, I don’t even know if it’s your style, but it seemed the Father wanted me to get it.” Inside the bag was an angora coat like cape. It was burgundy red and cream with stripes that made a V shape– a one size fits all. When I put it on, the Holy Spirit hit me! I knew what it meant. It was my coat of many colors. And no, I am not Joseph. Far from it.  But at that moment, I knew Abba, and my husband had just given me my coat.  I had felt like Mary Poppin’s without her umbrella or carpet bag.

P.L. Travers, author of the childhood tale got the idea of Mary from her aunt Ellie (Name meaning great light/ El as in El Shaddai).  Ellie, was a spinster who carried a carpetbag. When children came to stay, she gave them lessons in etiquette, suffered no-nonsense, and instructed them to “Spit spot into bed!”

I want to share a wonderful comparison of the anointing and journey of Joseph and David and ask you to think about your own life. Joseph was given 4 coats. These had intricate meanings. David, too, was given articles including, a coat. David was anointed three times. Both Joseph and David experienced similar journeys concerning hatred, humility, crushing, and maturity in order to receive the final mantle and the oil once they were mature enough for their assignments and prepared for Leadership. What comparisons can we learn from their journey, and how can this pattern guide us in our own lives? Anointing is a symbol that indicates authority that is given to a person. Each time David was anointed, his measure of authority increased. When he was to receive a new measure of authority, he was anointed again. Each time Joseph was given a new coat, his measure of testing and learning increased until he was wise enough to save a people during famine.

David’s 1st Anointing: “So Jesse sent for his youngest son and brought him in. He was ruddy, with beautiful eyes and a handsome appearance. And the LORD said, “Rise and anoint him, for he is the one.”

So Samuel took the horn of oil and anointed him in the presence of his brothers, and the Spirit of the LORD rushed upon David from that day forward. Then Samuel set out and went to Ramah” (I Samuel 16:12-13, BSB).

The Holy Ruach Spirit rushed upon him, and his eyes were beautiful to see into spiritual things. He is anointed by Adonai and not men. He is anointed in front of his family. After being hunted by King Saul for around 8 years, David is told to go to Hebron, and he is anointed the second time there.

David’s 2nd Anointing: “Then the men of Judah came to Hebron, and there they anointed David king over the house of Judah. And they told David, “It was the men of Jabesh-gilead who buried Saul.” (II Samuel 2:4).

David is anointed now by the men of Judah. This was the anointing of acceptance.

The third anointing is a picture of Messiah. David is anointed the 3rd time, and he rules over all of Israel and Judah. He is 30 years old when he becomes king. Yeshua is 30 years old when he starts his ministry. “Joseph was 30 when the king made him governor, and he went everywhere for the king.” David was the young shepherd tending his father’s sheep. Yeshua was the Chief Shepherd tending His Father’s Sheep. Some scholars believe Yeshua died exactly 1,000 years after David’s death. A day unto the Lord is but 1,000 years and a 1,000 years a day.” David was prophet, priest, and king, just as Yeshua.

David’s 3rd Anointing:  

“So all the elders of Israel came to the king at Hebron, where King David made with them a covenant before the LORD. And they anointed him king over Israel. David was thirty years old when he became king, and he reigned forty years. In Hebron he reigned over Judah seven years and six months, and in Jerusalem he reigned thirty-three years over all Israel and Judah.” (II Samuel 5:3-4). This is a prophetic picture as well. Yeshua is 33 years old when crucified. We also see the 7 years and 6 months as a picture of tribulation and the Messianic Kingdom.

After David’s first anointing, we see jealousy and suspicion, and hatred coming from family. Joseph experiences the same hatred shortly after receiving his coat of many colors.

“Joseph’s coat of many colors was a kethoneth. Also, the fine robes of the king’s virgin daughters were kethoneth (2 Sam. 13:18). It is used as an evidence of honor of high position in Isaiah 22:21. Such robes were drawn up when working or running (2 Kings 4:29; 1 Kings 18:46). Similarly, Peter tells us to “gird up the loins of our mind” (1 Peter 1:13).” (Ancient Hebrew Clothing—Jeff Benner).

David’s 1st battles with family:  David’s father tells him to take grain, bread, and cheese and check on his brothers. For forty days, the Philistine Goliath came forward every morning and evening to take his stand and mock the army of Yah.

“David asked the men who were standing with him, “What will be done for the man who kills this Philistine and removes this disgrace from Israel? Just who is this uncircumcised Philistine, that he should defy the armies of the living God?” The people told him about the offer, saying, “That is what will be done for the man who kills him.”

Now when David’s oldest brother Eliab heard him speaking to the men, his anger burned against David. “Why have you come down here?” he asked. “And with whom did you leave those few sheep in the wilderness? I know your pride and wickedness of heart—you have come down to see the battle!” (I Samuel 17:26-28).

Although Eliab was tall and handsome like Saul, Adonai told Samuel that he was not to be king. Eliab knew that David had been anointed by Samuel for a great assignment and was jealous of his younger brother’s favor with God. He accuses him of the very thing in his own heart, pride, and envy. Shortly after defeating the giant, David is given his first coat/ girdle, sword, belt, etc.

David’s Girdle/coat: Then Jonathan made a covenant with David because he loved him as himself. And Jonathan removed the robe he was wearing and gave it to David, along with his tunic, his sword, his bow, and his belt.” (I Samuel 18:3).

This is a prophetic picture of Jonathan (Adonai) passing down the kingship. Jonathan means YHVH (The Lord has given). Now, David, like Joseph in Egypt, is given his first assignment after his victory over the giant.

 This is more of a message for early leadership and young prophets, but it stands true in many other positions Adonai is preparing a person for. Compare your own battles and favor from the Father.

So David marched out and prospered in everything Saul sent him to do, and Saul set him over the men of war. And this was pleasing in the sight of all the people, and of Saul’s officers as well.” (I Samuel 18:4-5).

(1 Samuel 18:30) “Every time the Philistine commanders came out for battle, David was more successful than all of Saul’s officers, so that his name was highly esteemed.

  1. David is anointed by Samuel after protecting his father’s sheep from the lion and the bear.
  2. David defeats the Giant with a slingshot and 5 smooth stones (Torah). This can be about our own battles in the mind/thoughts. Yeshua was tempted and battled the adversary for 40 days just as this philistine giant had mocked and taunted all Israel for 40 days. Yeshua and David defeated the adversary with the Torah (5 stones).
  3. David afterward is given several positions by King Saul, and he is highly esteemed.
  4. Now, David will be hated by his father-in-law, king Saul.  Saul has a spirit of fear, jealousy, suspicion, dread, and a murderous spirit for David. “They have ascribed to David ten thousand, but to me they have ascribed thousands. Now what more can he have but the kingdom?” Saul looked at David with suspicion from that day on.” (I Samuel 18:8). “Now Saul was afraid of David, for the LORD was with him but had departed from Saul” (I Sam. 18:12). “When Saul saw that he was prospering greatly, he dreaded him” (I Sam. 18:15). Saul continues plotting schemes against David. “When Saul saw and knew that the LORD was with David, and that Michal, Saul’s daughter, loved him, then Saul was even more afraid of David. Thus, Saul was David’s enemy continually.” (I Samuel 18:28).

After the intense hatred comes a period of battling–this may look different depending on the assignment or calling, but it will be a battle no less. This is when your enemy or enemies recruit others to hate you, lie about you, chase you down to remove your assignment. This is the hounds of hell on your heel’s day after day. This is the period that seems to break a person. That is just what Adonai is looking for—a complete death to everything in this world and anything in us that is not of Him. Complete brokenness– like a wild horse trained for battle. This is when one acquires the anointing of humility—yes, great humbleness like the man Moses acquired. It is a time when you may be alone like Joseph in the prison or as David hiding in caves and rocks. This is the major preparation period, and this period usually lasts a long time. It ends with a second anointing, but the training is still not complete.

three tan running horses near rocky mountain during daytime

After David is given a test to destroy his enemy and take his life, he passes these by not touching the one who was anointed before him. Repeat that. Once King Saul and his sons are slain in battle, David only mentions the good Saul did and not the bad. He is ready for that second anointing and then the 3rd. It is now around 15 years later since he was 1st anointed. Notice during this waiting period, he is still working and writing a large majority of Psalms. He is still defeating enemies and taking wives.

“The Talmud (Horiyot 11b) explains that whereas all High Priests were anointed, a king was only anointed if he began a new dynasty or if there was some controversy surrounding his appointment. It should be noted that since oil was typically used to anoint people to greatness, the Torah occasionally uses the term to anoint (“mashach”) where it simply means to appoint to high position, without the use of oil (see e.g. I Kings 19:16,19 regarding Elijah’s appointment of Elisha as his successor, and Isaiah 61:1). Likewise, the Torah occasionally uses the term “the anointed one” = “mashiach” / “messiah” to refer to any person appointed to carry out an important task.” (Aish.com).

Elijah passed his mantle down to Elisha. The prophets had their own robes of beauty and authority. Although they did not look like the priest, they would have been distinct and recognizable.

 Joseph’s coats: This will entail the prophets’ journey. Joseph, like David, is anointed. His father, Jacob, gives him his colorful prophetic coat.  After receiving the coat, he begins to have vivid dreams. This is when hatred from his brothers and suspicion and pondering from his father occur. To my readers, your anointing will first be attacked by those closest to you—family/friends.

Joseph’s 1st coat:  “Now Israel loved Joseph more than his other sons, because Joseph had been born to him in his old age; so he made him a robe of many colors” (Genesis 37:3).

Joseph’s battle with family: His brothers saw that their father loved him more than all his brothers; and so they hated him and could not speak to him on friendly terms. (Gen. 37:4).

This may not come from jealousy of the young prophet being loved greater by a parent, but it could. It could also come from the young prophet marrying someone the family becomes jealous of or sibling rivalries like Cain and Esau. This may also be a parent who is very jealous of their own child or son in law.

“Then Joseph had a dream, and when he told it to his brothers, they hated him even more.”

This isa season where the prophet is just tasting the gifting of a Seer, and it is met with much jealousy and envy, just as David’s battle victories were. In the passage below, we see Joseph was in the valley of Hebron. Later, the Father gives Hebron to king David as the capital of his kingdom (2 Samuel 2:1).

“Then Israel told him, “Go now and see how your brothers and the flocks are faring and bring word back to me.”

So, he sent him off from the Valley of Hebron. And when Joseph arrived in Shechem (Shoulder—ridge), a man found him wandering in the field and asked, “What are you looking for?” “I am looking for my brothers,” Joseph replied. “Can you please tell me where they are pasturing their flocks?” “They have moved on from here,” the man answered. “I heard them say, ‘Let us go to Dothan.’ ” So Joseph set out after his brothers and found them at Dothan.” Dothan means two cisterns or wells. Joseph today is looking for His brother Judah and learning much from his Big brother, and Judah is seeing Messiah as Joseph unveils his identity. One day we all will be at that table eating and drinking–echad.

But for now, in our story, Joseph, the prophet, is wandering around looking for “his brothers.” The prophet must find those who are also seers and gather as they were doing at the school of the prophets that Samuel started later.  But the first assignment given to the prophet is often among his or her own family.

Pay close attention young prophets, apostles, teachers, and leadership. After the favor from (Abba Father—Israel), and the coat of many colors comes intense hatred. After the gifts are revealed, the hatred is even greater. Also, Joseph is searching for his brothers. His brothers want to abort his assignment. They want to snuff out his dreams and his life. David says his enemies hate him without cause. He says his enemies are more than the hairs on his head. Can you see the jealousy and envy Joseph will have to fight and endure over the mantle given to him? Can you see the long journey ahead for David as he runs for his life and even feigns himself a madman at one point.

green tree on green grass field during daytime

 (The city of Dothan is mentioned once more during the kingdom years, when it appears to have been the hometown of Elisha the prophet) (2 Kings 6:13) Again, Dothan means two wells or two cisterns.)

“Now Joseph’s brothers saw him in the distance, and before he arrived, they plotted to kill him. “Here comes that dreamer!” they said to one another. “Come now, let us kill him and throw him into one of the pits. We can say that a vicious animal has devoured him. Then we shall see what becomes of his dreams!” (Genesis 37:18-19).

As we follow along, we see that after the giving of the mantle, the anointing oil poured out, and spiritual gifts comes jealousy and hatred that is so violent that they throw him in a pit and discuss murdering him. The young prophet and even the older prophet experience this in major ways. When Joseph’s coat is given to his father with the blood of a goat, he says, a vicious animal has done this—yes, their wild beastly nature had taken over. Notice the goat is used to dip Joseph’s mantle in. Often the prophet is made the scapegoat in the family. Prophetic ones often cause the other members of the family to see their reflection, their faults, and injustices. The scapegoat often sees the things in the family that needs corrected, healed, changed, and made holy, but most people do not like looking in the mirror, and they don’t want to hear correction from their younger brother.

“Rabbi Chiya: Regarding Isaac [when he felt Jacob’s goatskin-covered arms] the verse states, “Are you indeed my son Esau or not?” (Gen. 27:21). And therefore regarding Jacob the verse states, “Is it your son’s tunic or not?” This is all because the Holy One, blessed be He, is meticulous with tzadikim to a hair’s breadth.”

“Then they took Joseph’s robe, slaughtered a young goat, and dipped the robe in its blood. They sent the robe of many colors to their father and said, “We found this. Examine it to see whether it is your son’s robe or not.” His father recognized it and said, “It is my son’s robe! A vicious animal has devoured him. Joseph has surely been torn to pieces!” (Genesis 37:31-33).

Yes, the young prophet is torn to pieces by his own household. The young prophet is also a tad arrogant and not fully ready for the gifts. They may need to keep the gloves on for a bit longer. When the prophet is given the first mantle, they are usually in denial. Surprise. Wonder. Curiosity. Asking questions and revealing dreams and visions to those around them. Those who need not hear.

After Joseph is saved by Judah from death, he is taken to Egypt and is given another coat, which is a comparison of David’s journey. He learns to be a servant. He wears the servant’s coat. Notice how David and Joseph are given positions of power, much favor from Adonai and how both will be wrongfully accused.

 “And the LORD was with Joseph, and he became a successful man, serving in the household of his Egyptian master. When his master saw that the LORD was with him and made him prosper in all he did, Joseph found favor in his sight and became his personal attendant.” (Genesis 39:3-4).

After Potiphar’s wife becomes lustful for Joseph, he is tested here and ends up fleeing and leaving that coat behind, but it is his coat once again that is used in deception against him. According to some Hebrew scholars, he was wearing a servant or slave attire and would have fled almost naked. And yet, if he had not been accused and placed in prison, he would have never been able to interpret the dreams of the baker and cupbearer and be remembered with favor and brought before the Pharaoh. All our trials are leading us to our destination. The harder the trials and testing, the greater the assignment. We have to have a greater fear of Adonai, a Holy fear, and no fear of man, which brings a snare.

difficult roads lead to beautiful destinations desk decor

The medieval Sefer HaYashar, a commentary on the Torah, gives Potiphar’s wife’s name as Zuleikha, as do many Islamic traditions. Zuleikha means brilliant beauty, but Joseph was strong enough to resist it. Your testing may not come in a man or woman but fame or fortune, esteem of men and others. But even our adversary appears as an angel of light.

“So Potiphar’s wife kept Joseph’s cloak beside her until his master came home. Then she told him the same story: “The Hebrew slave you brought us came to me to make sport of me, but when I screamed for help, he left his cloak beside me and ran out of the house.” (Genesis 39:16-18).

The next mantle Joseph will receive will be the coat of humility. He will be placed in prison but once again in a position of power. The final testing is the greatest. Like David running for his life year after year, Joseph will be imprisoned and placed in the fetters. Psalm 105 is rich with treasures to glean from.

“He permitted no man to oppress them,

            And He reproved kings for their sakes:

      15“Do not touch My anointed ones,

            And do My prophets no harm.”

      16And He called for a famine upon the land;

            He broke the whole staff of bread.

      17He sent a man before them,

            Joseph, who was sold as a slave.

      18They afflicted his feet with fetters,

            He himself was laid in irons;

      19Until the time that his word came to pass,

            The word of the LORD tested him.

      20The king sent and released him,

            The ruler of peoples, and set him free.

      21He made him lord of his house

            And ruler over all his possessions,

      22To imprison his princes at will,

            That he might teach his elders wisdom.” (Psalm 105:14-22).

Notice, Joseph gets his greatest wisdom, as does David, after being crushed. Those who have suffered greatly teach the elders wisdom. Ponder that. An Elder is not only a person advanced age but a man of social status and wisdom. Joseph taught those in authority, wisdom. But he would never do that without the pit, the prison, the false accusations, and the hatred from those he loved. So, we count it all joy when we go through trials!!

Notice how similar this passage is to some about David earlier.

“While Joseph was there in the prison, the LORD was with him and extended kindness to him, granting him favor in the eyes of the prison warden. And the warden put all the prisoners under Joseph’s care, so that he was responsible for all that was done in the prison. The warden did not concern himself with anything under Joseph’s care, because the LORD was with Joseph and gave him success in whatever he did.” (Gen. 39:20-23).

By the time Joseph was released from prison and appointed as head over Egypt, Joseph was 30 years of age (Genesis 41:46). Just as David, Just as Yeshua. Joseph was 17 when he was sold to Egypt, so his first anointing may have been around the same time as David’s.

Joseph is taken from the prison because of interpreting the Baker and the Cupbearer’s dreams. Although he is forgotten and 2 years go by, he is eventually remembered and ushered in.

Now, he will remove his prison attire because he is humble and mature enough for the position. He now will save a people. Can you see Yeshua? “Although He was a Son, He learned obedience from what He suffered” (Hebrews 5:8).

“Then Pharaoh said to his servants, “Can we find a man like this, in whom is a divine spirit?” So Pharaoh said to Joseph, “Since God has informed you of all this, there is no one so discerning and wise as you are. “You shall be over my house, and according to your command all my people shall do homage; only in the throne I will be greater than you.” Pharaoh said to Joseph, “See, I have set you over all the land of Egypt.” Then Pharaoh took off his signet ring from his hand and put it on Joseph’s hand, and clothed him in garments of fine linen and put the gold necklace around his neck.

Pharaoh commands the people to bow the knee to Joseph. We know that every knee will bow before Messiah when He returns in power and great Glory.

I believe we can see Messiah Yeshua in both these men, and prophetically speaking, I would advise you to study II Samuel 5:5. This is a picture of Messiah and His Kingdom. May your journey be filled with awe and wonder and more so through your trials and suffering. May joy pour forth. May oil be poured upon your heads. May your bloody coat be exchanged for a beautiful robe, for you are a King’s daughter or son.

Blessings,

Tekoa

Word definitions–Abarim Publications

Photos–Unsplash

Author:

Tekoa Manning is the author of two fictional works, Walter the Homeless Man, and Polishing Jade. She is also the author of several inspirational teaching books including her devotional Thirsting for Water, and Blow a Trumpet in Tekoa, a more in-depth study of the Biblical Feasts. Her popular series, Doctrines of Demons, will be releasing part three during the summer of 2019. These books uncover a plethora of man-made doctrines that have crept in overtime, including heaven, hell, and satan. Manning has been featured numerous times on Hebrew Nation Radio, as well as Messianic Lamb Radio. She has won several awards for her pen, including the Kentuckiana Metroversity poetry prize for Women's History. Her historical fiction was accepted to the Kentucky Book Fair in 2015. Tekoa is a lover and devoted student of God's Word. She is an active blogger whose words help bring healing to the sick, downcast, and those suffering from a broken heart. Manning is a lover of dreams and gifted in the area of interpretation. She is the mother of three sons, one grandson, and the wife of a retired police chief. Tekoa and her husband reside in a small town in Kentucky where the deer roam free.

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