I Luz You and Almonds

This blog on the Luz bone was written around 2017 and shared on Grace in Torah. After closing my website Obadiah’s Cave, I am uploading many of these blogs that I feel have worth. I pray it blesses you.

Have you ever pondered how all the graves will open? Not when, but how? Will we come up out of the sea—the earth—an urn? Even the people who sharks have eaten? The graves will open on “that day.” Bodies shipwrecked at sea—bodies waiting in pine boxes under the earth—and ash remains tucked inside urns will all give up their dead. When studying resurrection, consider the Luz bone, a bone that is said cannot be crushed, burned, or destroyed. The Father presents Ezekiel with a question concerning bones: 

“Son of man, can these bones live?” And I answered, “O Lord GOD, You know.” Again He said to me, “Prophesy over these bones and say to them, ‘O dry bones, hear the word of the LORD.’ “Thus says the Lord GOD to these bones, ‘Behold, I will cause breath to enter you that you may come to life. ‘I will put sinews on you, make flesh grow back on you, cover you with skin and put breath in you that you may come alive; and you will know that I am the LORD.”

—Ezekiel 37:3-6, NASB

Image result for luz bone

The rabbi’s claim there is a bone in our brains that never deteriorates. They say it cannot be burned, crushed, or broken. What does this bone have to do with the tassels that hang off a Jewish prayer shawl with four corners called a tallith? Much. The first place we read about the wings of this prayer shawl is after the Father delivers his people from Egypt: “You yourselves have seen what I did to the Egyptians, and how I bore you on eagles’ wings, and brought you to Myself” (Exodus 19:4, NASB). 

sakura tree
Photo by Oleg Magni on Pexels.com

Isaiah, Chapter 11, gives a prophetic glimpse of a future time when the Father will gather t banished/dispersed ones from the four corners of the earth. In the Book of Numbers, Adonai gives special instructions for a prayer shawl and its four corners having tassels called tzitzit

The Lord also spoke to Moses, saying, “Speak to the sons of Israel, and tell them that they shall make for themselves tassels on the corners of their garments throughout their generations, and that they shall put on the tassel of each corner a cord of blue.”

—Numbers 15:38-39, NASB

The color blue is my husband’s favorite color, and it’s also the color of most of his clothing. As I was thinking about how to go about describing a color so blue that it turns green in the sunlight and then bluer than a violet purple mixed with seawater, I lost the ability to express such splendor. This dye was created by an animal that went extinct thousands of years ago.

According to the Talmud, the dye of Tekhelet (a shade of blue) was produced from a marine creature known as the Ḥillazon (also spelled Chilazon).

A one of a kind color. However, about twenty years ago, Israeli divers discovered this same mollusk in the Red/ Reed Sea. The blue dye is made by extracting a thick liquid from a gland in the mollusk to produce the brilliant dye. Why would such a color be important? Everything HaShem does is intricate and has a deeper meaning behind it. This dye was used for the priestly garments–the temple tapestry and the tallit (Prayer shawl).

HaShem gives special instructions about a prayer shawl and four corners with tassels called Tzitzit. I started meditating on these four corners and the earth.

“The Lord also spoke to Moses, saying, “Speak to the sons of Israel, and tell them that they shall make for themselves tassels on the corners of their garments throughout their generations and that they shall put on the tassel of each corner a cord of blue” (Numbers 15:38-39 NASB).

A cord of heavenly sapphire blue–the color of Yahweh’s Glory.

“And they saw the God of Israel: and there was under his feet as it were a paved work of a sapphire stone, and as it were the body of heaven in his clearness” (Exodus 24:10 KJV).

After the Father instructs them, He tells them why they need these tassels. The King James Version has translated the tassels as “fringes,” however, they are called Tzitzit, also called tzitziyot. `

“It shall be a tassel for you to look at and remember all the commandments of the Lord (Adonai,) so as to do them and not ­­­­­-­­follow after your own heart and your own eyes, after which you played the harlotso that you may remember to do all My commandments and be holy to your God” (Numbers 15:39-40).

 The word Tzitzit means BLOSSOM. It’s like the rod of Aaron that budded and bloomed. These blossoms will bring forth fruit. How? When we keep the Commandments, we bear fruit. When we honor His Torah by not just knowing it but doing it, we bear much fruit.

Most of Yeshua’s Body is familiar with the Ten Commandments (Ten Sayings), but many may not know there are 613 Commandments wrapped up in The Ten. 

The first place we read about these prayer shawls’ wings is after the Father saves His people from Egypt. “You yourselves have seen what I did to the Egyptians, and how I bore you on eagles’ wings and brought you to Myself” (Exodus 19:4).

The Rabbis teach that each arrangement of tassels should be seven white threads and one blue thread. For more information on the significance of the meaning behind the Hebrew numbers 7 & 8, here is a link to Grace in Torah, where you can also find some pretty amazing teachings.

This shawl is used at all significant events, from circumcision to weddings, and yes, even the dead are wrapped up in this garment. Death is something we see Yeshua triumphing over. Yes, death and the grave could not hold our Messiah!

 Let’s see how the Olive tree buries their dead since we were engrafted into it.

After a person dies, the eyes are closed, the body is laid on the floor and covered, and candles are lit next to the body. The body is never left alone until after burial, as a sign of respect. The people who sit with the dead body are called shomerim, from the root Shin-Mem-Reish, meaning “guards” or “keepers. — In preparation for the burial, the body is thoroughly cleaned and wrapped in a simple, plain linen shroud. The Sages decreed that both the dress of the body and the coffin should be simple, so that a poor person would not receive less honor in death than a rich person. The body is wrapped in a tallit with its tzitzit rendered invalid.” Jewfaq.org

Can you imagine our bodies being wrapped in the Word of Yahweh? Can you imagine all of the Father’s commandments and instructions for a blessed LIFE covering our dead bodies? Our dead bodies will come up out of the grave because Yeshua, our First Fruits, came forth out of the tomb wrapped in the same type of linen shroud and more than likely wrapped in His tallit.

This Tallit is two words, tal meaning tent and lit meaning little. “A little tent” that is like a canopy of protection hidden under His Torah–His commandments. When the shawl is pulled up over the head, it makes a prayer room. Psalms 91 talks about this canopy under the wings of Adonai. “He will cover you with His pinions, And under His wings, you may seek refuge; His faithfulness is a shield and bulwark” (Psalm 91:4).

When the woman with the issue of blood touched the hem of Jesus’ garments, she actually touched the Word of God. These shawls were what a Rabbi such as Yeshua would have worn, not some red Roman robe we see him often pictured as wearing. Many people touched this and were healed. Let’s look at scripture for certainty.

“Wherever He entered villages, or cities, or countryside, they were laying the sick in the market places, and imploring Him that they might just touch the fringe (Tzitzit) of His cloak; and as many as touched it were being cured” (Mark 6:56).

Scriptures concerning these four wings also discuss a time of latter days.

“But unto you that fear my name shall the Sun (Servant) of righteousness arise with healing in his wings; and ye shall go forth, and grow up as calves of the stall. And ye shall tread down the wicked; for they shall be ashes under the soles of your feet in the day that I shall do this, saith the LORD of hosts” (Malachi 4:1-2).

Yeshua is talking about Jacob’s trouble, and He says after the tribulation, we will see the sign of Him.

“And then the sign of the Son of Man will appear in the sky, and then all the tribes of the earth will mourn, and they will see the SON OF MAN COMING ON THE CLOUDS OF THE SKY with power and great glory. “And He will send forth His angels with A GREAT TRUMPET, and THEY WILL GATHER TOGETHER His elect from the four winds, from one end of the sky to the other” (Matthew 24:30-31).

“After this I saw four angels standing at the four corners of the earth, holding back its four winds so that no wind would blow on land or sea or on any tree” (Revelation 7:1).

So as I was meditating on the four corners of the earth and visualizing this mighty wind sweeping people up like a Hollywood production of tornado or Aliens, I decided it wouldn’t be like that at all. Didn’t the Son come to a carpenter from a rough place called Nazareth (Can any good thing come out of Nazareth?) And weren’t His parents so ordinary no one would make room for the delivery of the chosen One? Didn’t He ride on a humble donkey? Yes, but we have all these motion pictures and left behind series that have altered our thinking.

“According to the Zohar—an early Kabbalistic text—the resurrection will take place forty years after the arrival of Moshiach (Messiah). However, certain righteous individuals will arise with the coming of Moshiach (Messiah). All the dead will be resurrected in the Land of Israel.”

Notice the number 40 and all it entails.

So let’s get back to this death, and this body rolled up in a little tent—the wings of Yahweh and His mighty Torah protecting even our bones.

According to Aish.com, “Jewish tradition records that with burial, a single bone in the back of the neck never decays. It is from this bone – the luz bone – that the human body will be rebuilt in the future Messianic era when the souls of the departed will be reunited with their bodies.”

Yes! A BONE CALL THE LUZ.

I’m doing a snoopy dance right now!

YES! The Rabbi’s claim there is a bone in our brains that never disintegrates. They say it cannot be burned, crushed, or broken. But this gets deeper. Remember the Tzitzit? Those fringes that hung down that were braided and were referred to as almond buds or blossoms? Well, something else has the same meaning.

The word LUZ in Hebrew means nut or almond. So our brain even blossoms with the mind of Christ, our Yeshua Messiah.

The luz and the tallit with its Tzitzit represent an almond seed- a blossom—blooming and producing fruit and, yes, rising up out of the earth. It is believed by the Rabbi’s that this bone is strengthened and gains sustenance from a meal eaten called the Melave Malka. What is this strange word about?

“ Melaveh Malkah is the name of a meal that, as per halakha, is customarily held by Jews after their Sabbath, in other words, on Saturday evening. The intent of the meal is to figuratively escort the “Sabbath Queen” on her way out via singing and eating, as one would escort a monarch upon his departure from a city. This meal is alternatively called “the fourth meal.”

We must get back to His Holy Days and Feast. It was never Sunday.

And he said to them, “This is my blood of the covenant, which is poured out for many. Amen, I say to you, I shall not drink again of the fruit of the vine until that day when I drink it new in the kingdom of God.” And when they had sung a hymn, they went out to the Mount of Olives” (Mark 14:24-26)

This is new beginnings with the Messiah and the 8th day and the fullness of our new Kingdom filled with awe and glory unspeakable and unattainable in thought. More joy than one has ever felt. I can’t wait!

I LUZ my Yeshua, the One who died so we might have LIFE!

Sources:

The mystical bone of resurrection, Shapiro R., 1987, Department of Radiology, University of Miami School of Medicine, accessed 5 April 2014

http://pubs.rsna.org/doi/abs/10.1148%2Fradiology.163.3.718#comments

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Melaveh_Malkah

http://www.aish.com/ci/sam/48936292.html

Pictures: talentshare.org

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